Okinawa Marine official site
The Camp Foster wind turbine plays a crucial role in Marine Corps Installations Pacific’s mission to reduce its carbon footprint. The turbine was built in June 2013 to utilize the Okinawa winds as a renewable source of energy. “We had the turbine built as a way to experiment with different forms of renewable energy,” said Tomoko Matsuzaki, an energy engineer with facilities engineers, Facilities, MCIPAC-Marine Corps Base Camp Butler, Japan. “We’re always looking for new ways to create cleaner energy.” (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Lance Cpl. Daniel Jean-Paul/Released)
A more energy efficient Corps
The Camp Foster wind turbine plays a crucial role in Marine Corps Installations Pacific’s mission to reduce its carbon footprint. The turbine was built in June 2013 to utilize the Okinawa winds as a renewable source of energy. “We had the turbine built as a way to experiment with different forms of renewable energy,” said Tomoko Matsuzaki, an energy engineer with facilities engineers, Facilities, MCIPAC-Marine Corps Base Camp Butler, Japan. “We’re always looking for new ways to create cleaner energy.” (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Lance Cpl. Daniel Jean-Paul/Released)
Members of the Japan Ground Self Defense Force and Japan Disaster Medical Assistance Team assist a role player off an ambulance July 23, during the Churashima Rescue Exercise on Camp Naha, Okinawa, Japan. The annual exercise hosted by the 15th Brigade, Western Army, Japan Ground Self Defense Force, trains emergency responders for a swift reaction to the disaster effects of a trench-type earthquake. “In close cooperation with prefectural disaster response organizations, both civilian and defense, we practiced how information is shared, where we need to improve, and what we can accomplish next time more fully,” said Japan Ground Self Defense Force Lieutenant Colonel  Naruhito Seo, 15th Brigade Headquarters. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Daniel Jean-Paul/Released)
JSDF, Marines train for disasters
Members of the Japan Ground Self Defense Force and Japan Disaster Medical Assistance Team assist a role player off an ambulance July 23, during the Churashima Rescue Exercise on Camp Naha, Okinawa, Japan. The annual exercise hosted by the 15th Brigade, Western Army, Japan Ground Self Defense Force, trains emergency responders for a swift reaction to the disaster effects of a trench-type earthquake. “In close cooperation with prefectural disaster response organizations, both civilian and defense, we practiced how information is shared, where we need to improve, and what we can accomplish next time more fully,” said Japan Ground Self Defense Force Lieutenant Colonel Naruhito Seo, 15th Brigade Headquarters. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Daniel Jean-Paul/Released)
Members of the Japan Ground Self Defense Force and Japan Disaster Medical Assistance Team assist a role player off an ambulance July 23, during the Churashima Rescue Exercise on Camp Naha, Okinawa, Japan. The annual exercise hosted by the 15th Brigade, Western Army, Japan Ground Self Defense Force, trains emergency responders for a swift reaction to the disaster effects of a trench-type earthquake. “In close cooperation with prefectural disaster response organizations, both civilian and defense, we practiced how information is shared, where we need to improve, and what we can accomplish next time more fully,” said Japan Ground Self Defense Force Lieutenant Colonel  Naruhito Seo, 15th Brigade Headquarters. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Daniel Jean-Paul/Released)
JSDF, Marines train for disasters
Members of the Japan Ground Self Defense Force and Japan Disaster Medical Assistance Team assist a role player off an ambulance July 23, during the Churashima Rescue Exercise on Camp Naha, Okinawa, Japan. The annual exercise hosted by the 15th Brigade, Western Army, Japan Ground Self Defense Force, trains emergency responders for a swift reaction to the disaster effects of a trench-type earthquake. “In close cooperation with prefectural disaster response organizations, both civilian and defense, we practiced how information is shared, where we need to improve, and what we can accomplish next time more fully,” said Japan Ground Self Defense Force Lieutenant Colonel Naruhito Seo, 15th Brigade Headquarters. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Daniel Jean-Paul/Released)
Marines with Marine Corps Installations Pacific and Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadron 462, 1st Marine Aircraft Wing, 3rd Marine Expeditionary Force assist role players off a CH-53E Super Stallion July 23, during the Churashima Rescue Exercise on Camp Naha, Okinawa, Japan. The event marked the first year Marines participated in the exercise, supporting mutual preparation and demonstrating the importance of interoperability. “(The exercise) is exactly the type of mission that requires JSDF and the Marine Corps cooperation and coordination,” said Maj. Thai N. Nguyen, G-5, planner, MCIPAC. “When (this is) accomplished in advance of a disaster, (it) saves valuable time, resources, and lives.” (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Daniel Jean-Paul/Released)
JSDF, Marines train for disasters
Marines with Marine Corps Installations Pacific and Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadron 462, 1st Marine Aircraft Wing, 3rd Marine Expeditionary Force assist role players off a CH-53E Super Stallion July 23, during the Churashima Rescue Exercise on Camp Naha, Okinawa, Japan. The event marked the first year Marines participated in the exercise, supporting mutual preparation and demonstrating the importance of interoperability. “(The exercise) is exactly the type of mission that requires JSDF and the Marine Corps cooperation and coordination,” said Maj. Thai N. Nguyen, G-5, planner, MCIPAC. “When (this is) accomplished in advance of a disaster, (it) saves valuable time, resources, and lives.” (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Daniel Jean-Paul/Released)
Lt. Col. James Hurd, executive officer for Marine Corps Air Station Futenma, Okinawa, Japan, Marine Corps Installations Pacific, gives a command brief to Chugoku Shikoku Defense Bureau  officials, Okinawa Defense Bureau officials, Iwakuni City assembly members and Ginowan City Council members during a visit to the station to conduct a study tour, July 16, 2015. The purpose was to help deepen the distinguished guests’ understanding on national security here, and the mission of MCAS Futenma in support of III Marine Expeditionary Force’s aviation warfighting capabilities.
Iwakuni city assembly members visit MCAS Futenma
Lt. Col. James Hurd, executive officer for Marine Corps Air Station Futenma, Okinawa, Japan, Marine Corps Installations Pacific, gives a command brief to Chugoku Shikoku Defense Bureau officials, Okinawa Defense Bureau officials, Iwakuni City assembly members and Ginowan City Council members during a visit to the station to conduct a study tour, July 16, 2015. The purpose was to help deepen the distinguished guests’ understanding on national security here, and the mission of MCAS Futenma in support of III Marine Expeditionary Force’s aviation warfighting capabilities.
Gavin S. DeGraw sings to the audience during a free concert June 26 at the exchange complex on Camp Courtney, Okinawa. The event was organized by the Armed Forces Entertainment Group and hosted by Marine Corps Community Services. The concert drew an audience of approximately 1,000 service members, families and Okinawa residents. Degraw, a South Fallsburg, New York, native, has been a singer and songwriter with his band since 2003. (Marine Corps Photo by Cpl. Janessa K. Pon/ Released)
Gavin DeGraw performs live concert on Camp Courtney
Gavin S. DeGraw sings to the audience during a free concert June 26 at the exchange complex on Camp Courtney, Okinawa. The event was organized by the Armed Forces Entertainment Group and hosted by Marine Corps Community Services. The concert drew an audience of approximately 1,000 service members, families and Okinawa residents. Degraw, a South Fallsburg, New York, native, has been a singer and songwriter with his band since 2003. (Marine Corps Photo by Cpl. Janessa K. Pon/ Released)
U.S. Ambassador to Japan, Caroline Kennedy; U.S. Consul General, Alfred R. Magelby; and   Commanding General of Marine Corps Installations Pacific, Brig. Gen. Joaquin F. Malavet bow after placing flowers on the memorial during the remembrance ceremony June 23 at the Okinawa Peace Memorial Park. The ceremony was held on the 70th anniversary of the end of the Battle of Okinawa and brought approximately 5,400 people from Okinawa and other prefectures. Honored guests included Prime Minister of Japan, Shinzo Abe; Governor of Okinawa Prefecture, Takeshi Onaga; and the Deputy Commanding General United States Forces Japan, Brig. Gen. Mark R. Wise among others. During the ceremony there was a minute-long moment of silence at noon along with flowers brought to the front and placed on the memorial to honor the dead. Abe and Onaga also gave speaches expressing their grief and sorrow over the nearly 200,000 lives lost during the battle.
70th Anniversary Marks 70 Years of Peace
U.S. Ambassador to Japan, Caroline Kennedy; U.S. Consul General, Alfred R. Magelby; and Commanding General of Marine Corps Installations Pacific, Brig. Gen. Joaquin F. Malavet bow after placing flowers on the memorial during the remembrance ceremony June 23 at the Okinawa Peace Memorial Park. The ceremony was held on the 70th anniversary of the end of the Battle of Okinawa and brought approximately 5,400 people from Okinawa and other prefectures. Honored guests included Prime Minister of Japan, Shinzo Abe; Governor of Okinawa Prefecture, Takeshi Onaga; and the Deputy Commanding General United States Forces Japan, Brig. Gen. Mark R. Wise among others. During the ceremony there was a minute-long moment of silence at noon along with flowers brought to the front and placed on the memorial to honor the dead. Abe and Onaga also gave speaches expressing their grief and sorrow over the nearly 200,000 lives lost during the battle.
A newspaper from the end of World War II with the headline “Peace” in all capital letters lies on display at the Okinawa Prefectural Peace Memorial Museum in Itoman, Okinawa. A memorial service honoring the fallen men and women of the Battle of Okinawa was held on the 70th anniversary of the end of the battle June 23, at the Okinawa Peace Memorial Park. The ceremony had approximately 5,400 people in attendance from Okinawa and other prefectures. Honored guests included Prime Minister of Japan, Shinzo Abe; Governor of Okinawa Prefecture, Takeshi Onaga; U.S. Ambassador to Japan, Caroline Kennedy; U.S. Consul General, Alfred R. Magelby; Deputy Commanding General United States Forces Japan, Brig. Gen. Mark R. Wise; and Commanding General of Marine Corps Installations Pacific, Brig. Gen. Joaquin F. Malavet among others. During the ceremony there was a minute-long moment of silence at noon along with flowers brought to the front to honor the dead. Abe and Onaga also gave speaches expressing their grief and sorrow over the nearly 200,000 lives lost during the battle.
70th Anniversary Marks 70 Years of Peace
A newspaper from the end of World War II with the headline “Peace” in all capital letters lies on display at the Okinawa Prefectural Peace Memorial Museum in Itoman, Okinawa. A memorial service honoring the fallen men and women of the Battle of Okinawa was held on the 70th anniversary of the end of the battle June 23, at the Okinawa Peace Memorial Park. The ceremony had approximately 5,400 people in attendance from Okinawa and other prefectures. Honored guests included Prime Minister of Japan, Shinzo Abe; Governor of Okinawa Prefecture, Takeshi Onaga; U.S. Ambassador to Japan, Caroline Kennedy; U.S. Consul General, Alfred R. Magelby; Deputy Commanding General United States Forces Japan, Brig. Gen. Mark R. Wise; and Commanding General of Marine Corps Installations Pacific, Brig. Gen. Joaquin F. Malavet among others. During the ceremony there was a minute-long moment of silence at noon along with flowers brought to the front to honor the dead. Abe and Onaga also gave speaches expressing their grief and sorrow over the nearly 200,000 lives lost during the battle.
Nico, a military working dog, rest in the office after training in the hot sun June 19, on Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan. According to Staff Sgt. Daniel Andrzejewski, the kennel master for the Provost Marshal’s Office with Headquarters and Support Battalion, Marine Corps Installations Pacific, Marine Corps Base Camp Butler, Japan, though the dogs are not required to be out of the kennel for the majority of the work day, many handlers spend hours on end with their dogs. “A lot of the time (the dog handlers) will keep them out most of the day,” said Andrzejewski. “They’re not even training. Most of the time (handlers) will let the dogs hang out around the office while they work instead of leaving them in the kennels. I love (seeing) that because it shows me these guys really do love and care for the dogs.”
 (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Lance Cpl. Daniel Jean-Paul/Released)
Bond like no other
Nico, a military working dog, rest in the office after training in the hot sun June 19, on Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan. According to Staff Sgt. Daniel Andrzejewski, the kennel master for the Provost Marshal’s Office with Headquarters and Support Battalion, Marine Corps Installations Pacific, Marine Corps Base Camp Butler, Japan, though the dogs are not required to be out of the kennel for the majority of the work day, many handlers spend hours on end with their dogs. “A lot of the time (the dog handlers) will keep them out most of the day,” said Andrzejewski. “They’re not even training. Most of the time (handlers) will let the dogs hang out around the office while they work instead of leaving them in the kennels. I love (seeing) that because it shows me these guys really do love and care for the dogs.” (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Lance Cpl. Daniel Jean-Paul/Released)
A Marine with the Provost Marshal’s Office on Camp Courtney, Okinawa, Japan, places handcuffs on an Uruma City Police officer posing as an on-base intruder, June 11, during bilateral training between service members and the UCPD. The event ensured Marines with Camp Guard and the Provost Marshal’s Office are proficient in communicating with the UCPD to mitigate threats involving service members and Okinawa residents. During the training event, Camp Guard Marines patrolling the base perimeter apprehended a simulated armed intruder. PMO Marines received a notification over a radio signal and responded to rehearse turnover procedures of the intruder and escort him to the proper detainment authorities.  (Marine Corps Photo by Cpl. Janessa K. Pon/ Released)
Uruma City Police, Marines conduct bilateral security training
A Marine with the Provost Marshal’s Office on Camp Courtney, Okinawa, Japan, places handcuffs on an Uruma City Police officer posing as an on-base intruder, June 11, during bilateral training between service members and the UCPD. The event ensured Marines with Camp Guard and the Provost Marshal’s Office are proficient in communicating with the UCPD to mitigate threats involving service members and Okinawa residents. During the training event, Camp Guard Marines patrolling the base perimeter apprehended a simulated armed intruder. PMO Marines received a notification over a radio signal and responded to rehearse turnover procedures of the intruder and escort him to the proper detainment authorities. (Marine Corps Photo by Cpl. Janessa K. Pon/ Released)
Amy Duclos helps her daughter put on an obi, which is a sash worn over a yukata during a traditional Japanese clothing class June 19 at the Marine and Family Programs building on Camp Foster, Okinawa. The class, sponsored by Marine Corps Community Services, taught attendees how to wear a yukata, a Japanese garment worn during summer. The class also highlighted traditional Japanese culture and customs and the importance of service members and their families engaging in the local culture. Murayoshi is the instructor of the class, and a class coordinator with MCCS. (Marine Corps Photo by Cpl. Janessa K. Pon/ Released)
Service members play dress up: MCCS hosts cultural clothing class
Amy Duclos helps her daughter put on an obi, which is a sash worn over a yukata during a traditional Japanese clothing class June 19 at the Marine and Family Programs building on Camp Foster, Okinawa. The class, sponsored by Marine Corps Community Services, taught attendees how to wear a yukata, a Japanese garment worn during summer. The class also highlighted traditional Japanese culture and customs and the importance of service members and their families engaging in the local culture. Murayoshi is the instructor of the class, and a class coordinator with MCCS. (Marine Corps Photo by Cpl. Janessa K. Pon/ Released)
Okinawa residents step off of a KC-130J Super Hercules, June 6 during the Futenma Flightline Fair on Marine Corps Air Station Futenma, Okinawa, Japan. Guests were able to tour the each aircraft and meet the crew. “There are a lot of misconceptions about what happens on Futenma, especially with the protesters outside the gate,” said Capt. Mathew Kaczynski, a pilot and adjutant to the commanding officer of MCAS Futenma. “(The fair) allows us to correct those misconceptions. You don’t have to worry about those misconceptions when you get the chance to talk to the actual air crew of an Osprey face-to-face.”  (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Cpl. Royce Dorman/Released)
Futenma Flightline Fair bridges gap
Okinawa residents step off of a KC-130J Super Hercules, June 6 during the Futenma Flightline Fair on Marine Corps Air Station Futenma, Okinawa, Japan. Guests were able to tour the each aircraft and meet the crew. “There are a lot of misconceptions about what happens on Futenma, especially with the protesters outside the gate,” said Capt. Mathew Kaczynski, a pilot and adjutant to the commanding officer of MCAS Futenma. “(The fair) allows us to correct those misconceptions. You don’t have to worry about those misconceptions when you get the chance to talk to the actual air crew of an Osprey face-to-face.” (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Cpl. Royce Dorman/Released)
Brigadier Gen. Joaquin F. Malavet speaks during the Marine Corps Installations Pacific – Marine Corps Base Camp Butler change of command ceremony June 12, aboard Camp Foster Okinawa, Japan. Malavet took command of MCIPAC from Maj. Gen. Charles L. Hudson who will be the new commander of Marine Corps Installations Command, Headquarters Marine Corps, Washington, D.C. Malavet, who previously commanded 1st Marine Expeditionary Brigade and also served as the Deputy Commander for I MEF Camp Pendleton, California, is a naval aviator with almost thirty years’ experience as a commissioned officer including deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan and is also a graduate of The Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies. Malavet has a vast amount of experience with different exercises including joint exercise Pacific Horizon which is a crisis response exercise where 1st MEB takes on a support role similar to that of MCIPAC’s mission of supporting III MEF in crisis response situations. Malavet expressed how impressed he was with MCIPAC’s mission readiness and how he looks forward to these next few years as commander. “Most importantly I want to acknowledge and thank the Marines, sailors, civilians; both U.S. and Japanese, who work so hard and diligently with Marine Corps Installations Pacific.” (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Cpl. Janessa K. Pon/Released)
Marine Corps Installations Pacific bids Hudson farewell, welcomes Malavet
Brigadier Gen. Joaquin F. Malavet speaks during the Marine Corps Installations Pacific – Marine Corps Base Camp Butler change of command ceremony June 12, aboard Camp Foster Okinawa, Japan. Malavet took command of MCIPAC from Maj. Gen. Charles L. Hudson who will be the new commander of Marine Corps Installations Command, Headquarters Marine Corps, Washington, D.C. Malavet, who previously commanded 1st Marine Expeditionary Brigade and also served as the Deputy Commander for I MEF Camp Pendleton, California, is a naval aviator with almost thirty years’ experience as a commissioned officer including deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan and is also a graduate of The Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies. Malavet has a vast amount of experience with different exercises including joint exercise Pacific Horizon which is a crisis response exercise where 1st MEB takes on a support role similar to that of MCIPAC’s mission of supporting III MEF in crisis response situations. Malavet expressed how impressed he was with MCIPAC’s mission readiness and how he looks forward to these next few years as commander. “Most importantly I want to acknowledge and thank the Marines, sailors, civilians; both U.S. and Japanese, who work so hard and diligently with Marine Corps Installations Pacific.” (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Cpl. Janessa K. Pon/Released)
Major Gen. Charles L. Hudson speaks during the Marine Corps Installations Pacific – Marine Corps Base Camp Butler change of command ceremony June 12, aboard Camp Foster Okinawa, Japan. Brig. Gen. Malavet took command of MCIPAC from Hudson who will be the new commander of Marine Corps Installations Command, Headquarters Marine Corps, Washington, D.C. Hudson will also serve as the Assistant Deputy Commandant (ADC), Installations and Logistics (Facilities) and Commanding General, Marine Corps National Capital Region. 

Malavet, who previously commanded 1st Marine Expeditionary Brigade and also served as the Deputy Commander for I MEF Camp Pendleton, California, is a naval aviator with almost thirty years’ experience as a commissioned officer including deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan and is also a graduate of The Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies. Malavet has a vast amount of experience with different exercises including joint exercise Pacific Horizon which is a crisis response exercise where 1st MEB takes on a support role similar to that of MCIPAC’s mission of supporting III MEF in crisis response situations. Malavet expressed how impressed he was with MCIPAC’s mission readiness and how he looks forward to these next few years as commander. “Most importantly I want to acknowledge and thank the Marines, sailors, civilians; both U.S. and Japanese, who work so hard and diligently with Marine Corps Installations Pacific.” (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Cpl. Janessa K. Pon/Released)
Marine Corps Installations Pacific bids Hudson farewell, welcomes Malavet
Major Gen. Charles L. Hudson speaks during the Marine Corps Installations Pacific – Marine Corps Base Camp Butler change of command ceremony June 12, aboard Camp Foster Okinawa, Japan. Brig. Gen. Malavet took command of MCIPAC from Hudson who will be the new commander of Marine Corps Installations Command, Headquarters Marine Corps, Washington, D.C. Hudson will also serve as the Assistant Deputy Commandant (ADC), Installations and Logistics (Facilities) and Commanding General, Marine Corps National Capital Region. Malavet, who previously commanded 1st Marine Expeditionary Brigade and also served as the Deputy Commander for I MEF Camp Pendleton, California, is a naval aviator with almost thirty years’ experience as a commissioned officer including deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan and is also a graduate of The Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies. Malavet has a vast amount of experience with different exercises including joint exercise Pacific Horizon which is a crisis response exercise where 1st MEB takes on a support role similar to that of MCIPAC’s mission of supporting III MEF in crisis response situations. Malavet expressed how impressed he was with MCIPAC’s mission readiness and how he looks forward to these next few years as commander. “Most importantly I want to acknowledge and thank the Marines, sailors, civilians; both U.S. and Japanese, who work so hard and diligently with Marine Corps Installations Pacific.” (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Cpl. Janessa K. Pon/Released)
The color guard for Headquarters and Service Battalion, Marine Installations Pacific – Marine Corps Base Camp Butler retires the colors during the MCIPAC change of command ceremony June 12, aboard Camp Foster Okinawa, Japan. During the ceremony, Brig. Gen. Malavet took command of MCIPAC from Maj. Gen. Charles L. Hudson who will be the new commander of Marine Corps Installations Command, Headquarters Marine Corps, Washington, D.C. Malavet, who previously commanded 1st Marine Expeditionary Brigade and also served as the Deputy Commander for I MEF Camp Pendleton, California, is a naval aviator with almost thirty years’ experience as a commissioned officer including deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan and is also a graduate of The Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies. Malavet has a vast amount of experience with different exercises including joint exercise Pacific Horizon which is a crisis response exercise where 1st MEB takes on a support role similar to that of MCIPAC’s mission of supporting III MEF in crisis response situations. Malavet expressed how impressed he was with MCIPAC’s mission readiness and how he looks forward to these next few years as commander. “Most importantly I want to acknowledge and thank the Marines, sailors, civilians; both U.S. and Japanese, who work so hard and diligently with Marine Corps Installations Pacific.” (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Cpl. Janessa K. Pon/Released)
Marine Corps Installations Pacific bids Hudson farewell, welcomes Malavet
The color guard for Headquarters and Service Battalion, Marine Installations Pacific – Marine Corps Base Camp Butler retires the colors during the MCIPAC change of command ceremony June 12, aboard Camp Foster Okinawa, Japan. During the ceremony, Brig. Gen. Malavet took command of MCIPAC from Maj. Gen. Charles L. Hudson who will be the new commander of Marine Corps Installations Command, Headquarters Marine Corps, Washington, D.C. Malavet, who previously commanded 1st Marine Expeditionary Brigade and also served as the Deputy Commander for I MEF Camp Pendleton, California, is a naval aviator with almost thirty years’ experience as a commissioned officer including deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan and is also a graduate of The Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies. Malavet has a vast amount of experience with different exercises including joint exercise Pacific Horizon which is a crisis response exercise where 1st MEB takes on a support role similar to that of MCIPAC’s mission of supporting III MEF in crisis response situations. Malavet expressed how impressed he was with MCIPAC’s mission readiness and how he looks forward to these next few years as commander. “Most importantly I want to acknowledge and thank the Marines, sailors, civilians; both U.S. and Japanese, who work so hard and diligently with Marine Corps Installations Pacific.” (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Cpl. Janessa K. Pon/Released)
U.S. Marine Maj. Giuseppe E. Stavale details the role of the 3rd Law Enforcement Battalion in the III MEF mission to Japanese members of 136th Military Police, Japan Ground Self Defense Force during a tour May 28 on Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan. The visitors were treated to a tour of the camp and a demonstration of the tools that the 3rd LEB employs. Stavale is the executive officer for 3rd LEB, III MEF.
Local JGSDF military police tour 3rd Law Enforcement BN
U.S. Marine Maj. Giuseppe E. Stavale details the role of the 3rd Law Enforcement Battalion in the III MEF mission to Japanese members of 136th Military Police, Japan Ground Self Defense Force during a tour May 28 on Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan. The visitors were treated to a tour of the camp and a demonstration of the tools that the 3rd LEB employs. Stavale is the executive officer for 3rd LEB, III MEF.
Master Sgt. Kenneth M. Blankenship II, left, poses for a photo with Brig. Gen. Steven R. Rudder during a Purple Heart award ceremony May 27 at the Marine Corps Installations Pacific-Marine Corps Base Camp Butler, Japan headquarters building on Camp Foster, Okinawa. Blankenship earned a Purple Heart for his heroic actions and wounds received on October 8, 2013 in Camp Shorabak, Helmand Province, Afghanistan. While leaving a bank within the Camp Shorabak compound, a rogue Afghan National Army soldier began shooting at Blankenship and his two counterparts, according to the award citation read during the ceremony. One of the bullets ricocheted, impacting Blankenship's left knee. After reaching cover near an ANA vehicle, Blankenship shouldered his M16A4 service rifle, sighted in and returned fire. The rounds pierced their target killing the soldier, eliminating the enemy threat. Upon investigation of the incident, the enemy combatant was found with two magazines loaded with 28 rounds each. Without Blankenship's decisiveness and selfless actions, the amount of loss or injury to his fellow Marines could have been greater. Blankenship is the staff non-commissioned officer in charge of explosive ordinance disposal, Marine Aircraft Group-36, 1st Marine Aircraft Wing, III Marine Expeditionary Force. Rudder is the commanding general of 1st MAW, III MEF. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Brittany A. James/Released)
III MEF Marine receives Purple Heart
Master Sgt. Kenneth M. Blankenship II, left, poses for a photo with Brig. Gen. Steven R. Rudder during a Purple Heart award ceremony May 27 at the Marine Corps Installations Pacific-Marine Corps Base Camp Butler, Japan headquarters building on Camp Foster, Okinawa. Blankenship earned a Purple Heart for his heroic actions and wounds received on October 8, 2013 in Camp Shorabak, Helmand Province, Afghanistan. While leaving a bank within the Camp Shorabak compound, a rogue Afghan National Army soldier began shooting at Blankenship and his two counterparts, according to the award citation read during the ceremony. One of the bullets ricocheted, impacting Blankenship's left knee. After reaching cover near an ANA vehicle, Blankenship shouldered his M16A4 service rifle, sighted in and returned fire. The rounds pierced their target killing the soldier, eliminating the enemy threat. Upon investigation of the incident, the enemy combatant was found with two magazines loaded with 28 rounds each. Without Blankenship's decisiveness and selfless actions, the amount of loss or injury to his fellow Marines could have been greater. Blankenship is the staff non-commissioned officer in charge of explosive ordinance disposal, Marine Aircraft Group-36, 1st Marine Aircraft Wing, III Marine Expeditionary Force. Rudder is the commanding general of 1st MAW, III MEF. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Brittany A. James/Released)
Master Sgt. Kenneth M. Blankenship II receives a Purple Heart May 27 at the Marine Corps Installations Pacific-Marine Corps Base Camp Butler, Japan headquarters building on Camp Foster, Okinawa. Blankenship earned a Purple Heart for his heroic actions and wounds received on October 8, 2013 in Camp Shorabak, Helmand Province, Afghanistan. While leaving a bank within the Camp Shorabak compound, a rogue Afghan National Army soldier began shooting at Blankenship and his two counterparts, according to the award citation read during the ceremony. One of the bullets ricocheted, impacting Blankenship's left knee. After reaching cover near an ANA vehicle, Blankenship shouldered his M16A4 service rifle, sighted in and returned fire. The rounds pierced their target killing the soldier, eliminating the enemy threat. Upon investigation of the incident, the enemy combatant was found with two magazines loaded with 28 rounds each. Without Blankenship's decisiveness and selfless actions, the amount of loss or injury to his fellow Marines could have been greater. Blankenship is the staff non-commissioned officer in charge of explosive ordinance disposal, Marine Aircraft Group-36, 1st Marine Aircraft Wing, III Marine Expeditionary Force. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Brittany A. James/Released)
III MEF Marine receives Purple Heart
Master Sgt. Kenneth M. Blankenship II receives a Purple Heart May 27 at the Marine Corps Installations Pacific-Marine Corps Base Camp Butler, Japan headquarters building on Camp Foster, Okinawa. Blankenship earned a Purple Heart for his heroic actions and wounds received on October 8, 2013 in Camp Shorabak, Helmand Province, Afghanistan. While leaving a bank within the Camp Shorabak compound, a rogue Afghan National Army soldier began shooting at Blankenship and his two counterparts, according to the award citation read during the ceremony. One of the bullets ricocheted, impacting Blankenship's left knee. After reaching cover near an ANA vehicle, Blankenship shouldered his M16A4 service rifle, sighted in and returned fire. The rounds pierced their target killing the soldier, eliminating the enemy threat. Upon investigation of the incident, the enemy combatant was found with two magazines loaded with 28 rounds each. Without Blankenship's decisiveness and selfless actions, the amount of loss or injury to his fellow Marines could have been greater. Blankenship is the staff non-commissioned officer in charge of explosive ordinance disposal, Marine Aircraft Group-36, 1st Marine Aircraft Wing, III Marine Expeditionary Force. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Brittany A. James/Released)
Rear Adm. Brent W. Scott, 19th Chaplain of the Marine Corps, poses with Lance Cpl. Nelly, the canine mascot of 3rd Marine Logistics Group, III Marine Expeditionary Force, during a professional development training course May 19 at the Ocean Breeze Club, Camp Foster, Okinawa, Japan. The course is one of 12 hosted around the world, according to Scott, a Chillicothe, Miss., native. It reinforces chaplains on the subject of suicide prevention, intervention and postvention. This is the first time Scott has visited Okinawa as Chaplain of the Marine Corps. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Brittany A. James/Released)
Chaplain of the Marine Corps attends Chaplain Corps’ training course
Rear Adm. Brent W. Scott, 19th Chaplain of the Marine Corps, poses with Lance Cpl. Nelly, the canine mascot of 3rd Marine Logistics Group, III Marine Expeditionary Force, during a professional development training course May 19 at the Ocean Breeze Club, Camp Foster, Okinawa, Japan. The course is one of 12 hosted around the world, according to Scott, a Chillicothe, Miss., native. It reinforces chaplains on the subject of suicide prevention, intervention and postvention. This is the first time Scott has visited Okinawa as Chaplain of the Marine Corps. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Brittany A. James/Released)
Ginet Veal tosses a handful of pink dust into the air during the Color Me Fun 5k run May 23 on Camp Foster, Okinawa, Japan. The run was open to Status of Forces Agreement personnel with base access. Roughly 2,000 participants attended the run. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Sgt. Matthew Callahan/Released)
Camp Foster hosts Color Me Fun 5k Run
Ginet Veal tosses a handful of pink dust into the air during the Color Me Fun 5k run May 23 on Camp Foster, Okinawa, Japan. The run was open to Status of Forces Agreement personnel with base access. Roughly 2,000 participants attended the run. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Sgt. Matthew Callahan/Released)
Cpl. Chelsea Ricketts tosses pink powder at runners as they sprint past her during the Color Me Fun 5k Run May 23 on Camp Foster, Okinawa, Japan. Roughly 2,000 people participated in the run, which was open to U.S. forces personnel and their dependents, Department of Defense civilians and major labor contractor workers with access to the base. Ricketts is a Granite City, Ill. native, and motor transport operator with 3rd Medical Battalion, 3rd  Marine Logistics Group, III Marine Expeditionary Force. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Matthew Callahan)
Camp Foster hosts Color Me Fun 5k Run
Cpl. Chelsea Ricketts tosses pink powder at runners as they sprint past her during the Color Me Fun 5k Run May 23 on Camp Foster, Okinawa, Japan. Roughly 2,000 people participated in the run, which was open to U.S. forces personnel and their dependents, Department of Defense civilians and major labor contractor workers with access to the base. Ricketts is a Granite City, Ill. native, and motor transport operator with 3rd Medical Battalion, 3rd Marine Logistics Group, III Marine Expeditionary Force. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Matthew Callahan)
Lance Cpl. Conner M. Levinsky assists a student from E.C. Killin Elementary School, located on Camp Foster, Okinawa, Japan, in operating a hand line, also known as a fire hose, May 8, during a tour of the aircraft rescue and fire fighting station on Marine Corps Air Station Futenma, Okinawa, Japan. The tour was a part of a visit to the flight line on MCAS Futenma that provided students with the understanding of the ARFF Marines’ responsibilities with Headquarters and Headquarters Squadron, MCAS Futenma and the opportunity to explore various career paths. Levinsky, a rescueman with ARFF, H&HS, MCAS Futenma, is an El Dorado Hills, California, native. (Marine Corps Photo by Cpl. Janessa K. Pon/ Released)
MCAS Futenma Marines demonstrate career paths
Lance Cpl. Conner M. Levinsky assists a student from E.C. Killin Elementary School, located on Camp Foster, Okinawa, Japan, in operating a hand line, also known as a fire hose, May 8, during a tour of the aircraft rescue and fire fighting station on Marine Corps Air Station Futenma, Okinawa, Japan. The tour was a part of a visit to the flight line on MCAS Futenma that provided students with the understanding of the ARFF Marines’ responsibilities with Headquarters and Headquarters Squadron, MCAS Futenma and the opportunity to explore various career paths. Levinsky, a rescueman with ARFF, H&HS, MCAS Futenma, is an El Dorado Hills, California, native. (Marine Corps Photo by Cpl. Janessa K. Pon/ Released)
Marines contain a leaking ordnance round during leak, seal, package and decontamination training April 21 at the gas chamber on Camp Hansen, Okinawa. Explosive ordnance disposal technicians and chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear defense specialists placed a leaking ordnance package in the gas chamber, using chlorobenzylidene malonitrile, also known as tear gas, to simulate the emission of harmful gases.  The EOD technicians and CBRN defense specialists used protective equipment to safely contain the leaking ordnance and prepare the package for transport out of the affected area before completing the decontamination process. The training instilled the Marines’ confidence in the safety equipment and procedures used to mitigate CBRN-related hazards. The Marines are with 9th Engineer Support Battalion and Marine Logistics Group Headquarters Regiment, 3rd MLG, III Marine Expeditionary Force.
Marines rehearse critical EOD, CBRN, joint training
Marines contain a leaking ordnance round during leak, seal, package and decontamination training April 21 at the gas chamber on Camp Hansen, Okinawa. Explosive ordnance disposal technicians and chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear defense specialists placed a leaking ordnance package in the gas chamber, using chlorobenzylidene malonitrile, also known as tear gas, to simulate the emission of harmful gases. The EOD technicians and CBRN defense specialists used protective equipment to safely contain the leaking ordnance and prepare the package for transport out of the affected area before completing the decontamination process. The training instilled the Marines’ confidence in the safety equipment and procedures used to mitigate CBRN-related hazards. The Marines are with 9th Engineer Support Battalion and Marine Logistics Group Headquarters Regiment, 3rd MLG, III Marine Expeditionary Force.
A student from E.C. Killin Elementary School, Camp Foster, Okinawa, Japan, poses for a picture while wearing thermal protective equipment, May 8, during a tour of the aircraft rescue and fire fighting station on Marine Corps Air Station Futenma, Okinawa, Japan. The tour provided students with the understanding of ARFF Marines’ responsibilities within Headquarters and Headquarters Squadron, MCAS Futenma and the opportunity to explore various career paths. During the visit, ARFF Marines demonstrated the use of hand lines, also known as fire hoses; mounted water turrets; and the proper use of various personal protective equipment, such as gas masks, helmets with face shields, proximity equipment and footwear. After the demonstrations, the Marines taught the students how to properly use and operate the equipment. (Marine Corps Photo by Cpl. Janessa K. Pon/ Released)
MCAS Futenma Marines demonstrate career paths
A student from E.C. Killin Elementary School, Camp Foster, Okinawa, Japan, poses for a picture while wearing thermal protective equipment, May 8, during a tour of the aircraft rescue and fire fighting station on Marine Corps Air Station Futenma, Okinawa, Japan. The tour provided students with the understanding of ARFF Marines’ responsibilities within Headquarters and Headquarters Squadron, MCAS Futenma and the opportunity to explore various career paths. During the visit, ARFF Marines demonstrated the use of hand lines, also known as fire hoses; mounted water turrets; and the proper use of various personal protective equipment, such as gas masks, helmets with face shields, proximity equipment and footwear. After the demonstrations, the Marines taught the students how to properly use and operate the equipment. (Marine Corps Photo by Cpl. Janessa K. Pon/ Released)
The Single Marine Program dragon boat team competes in the 41st annual Naha City Dragon Boat Races, also known as Harii,  May 5 at Tomari Port in Naha City, Okinawa. The SMP dragon boat team was made up of approximately 44 Marines and sailors. They began practicing two months prior to the competition, according to Satsuki Fraling, the SMP coordinator with Marine Corps Community Services. A dragon boat is a human-powered watercraft originating from China, according to Fraling, a Naha City, Okinawa, native. It became a tradition where fishermen took boats out to sea to pray for safe travels and health for the upcoming year. Later the tradition evolved into a festival taking place on Okinawa. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brittany A. James/Released)
Releasing the beast: SMP competes in annual Dragon Boat Race finals
The Single Marine Program dragon boat team competes in the 41st annual Naha City Dragon Boat Races, also known as Harii, May 5 at Tomari Port in Naha City, Okinawa. The SMP dragon boat team was made up of approximately 44 Marines and sailors. They began practicing two months prior to the competition, according to Satsuki Fraling, the SMP coordinator with Marine Corps Community Services. A dragon boat is a human-powered watercraft originating from China, according to Fraling, a Naha City, Okinawa, native. It became a tradition where fishermen took boats out to sea to pray for safe travels and health for the upcoming year. Later the tradition evolved into a festival taking place on Okinawa. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brittany A. James/Released)
Lance Cpl. Kevin D. Jolly, left, a basic electrician with Facilities Engineering, Marine Corps Installations, Pacific-Marine Corps Base Camp Butler, Japan, accepts a trophy from Masaharu Minei, chief of the dragon boat organization, on behalf of the Single Marine Program dragon boat team May 5 during the 41st annual Naha City Dragon Boat Races, also known as Harii, at Tomari Port in Naha City, Okinawa. More than 60 teams competed in the races, making a total of approximately 2,300 participants. Three teams, consisting of 32 people per boat, competed against each other in every race. The SMP dragon boat team was made up of approximately 44 Marines and sailors. SMP was slated to participate in two races during the event, but winning their first race with a time of five minutes and 33 seconds, they earned a place to compete in a third race — for the championship. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brittany A. James/Released)
Releasing the beast: SMP competes in annual Dragon Boat Race finals
Lance Cpl. Kevin D. Jolly, left, a basic electrician with Facilities Engineering, Marine Corps Installations, Pacific-Marine Corps Base Camp Butler, Japan, accepts a trophy from Masaharu Minei, chief of the dragon boat organization, on behalf of the Single Marine Program dragon boat team May 5 during the 41st annual Naha City Dragon Boat Races, also known as Harii, at Tomari Port in Naha City, Okinawa. More than 60 teams competed in the races, making a total of approximately 2,300 participants. Three teams, consisting of 32 people per boat, competed against each other in every race. The SMP dragon boat team was made up of approximately 44 Marines and sailors. SMP was slated to participate in two races during the event, but winning their first race with a time of five minutes and 33 seconds, they earned a place to compete in a third race — for the championship. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brittany A. James/Released)
U.S. Marine V-22 Ospreys fly into Tribhuvan International Airport in Kathmandu, Nepal, May 3. U.S. Marines also brought an UH-1N Huey, tools and equipment to support the government of Nepal. The Nepalese Government requested the U.S. Government’s help after a 7.8 magnitude earthquake struck their country, April 25. The Marines are with Marine All-Weather Fighter Attack Squadron 242, Marine Aircraft Group 12, I Marine Aircraft Wing, III Marine Expeditionary Force. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Mandaline Hatch/Released)
U.S. Marine aircraft arrive in Kathmandu to support Nepal earthquake relief
U.S. Marine V-22 Ospreys fly into Tribhuvan International Airport in Kathmandu, Nepal, May 3. U.S. Marines also brought an UH-1N Huey, tools and equipment to support the government of Nepal. The Nepalese Government requested the U.S. Government’s help after a 7.8 magnitude earthquake struck their country, April 25. The Marines are with Marine All-Weather Fighter Attack Squadron 242, Marine Aircraft Group 12, I Marine Aircraft Wing, III Marine Expeditionary Force. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Mandaline Hatch/Released)
U.S. Marines, Lance Cpl. Jacob A. Miller (top), Cpl. Garrett Gloska and Cpl. Eugene Ganiron, step off a Boeing C-17 Globemaster III onto Tribhuvan International Airport in Kathmandu, Nepal, May 3. Marines brought an UH-1N Huey, tools and equipment to support the government of Nepal. The Nepalese Government requested the U.S. Government’s help after a 7.8 magnitude earthquake struck their country, April 25. The Marines are with Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 469, Marine Air Group 36, I Marine Aircraft Wing, III Marine Expeditionary Force. Miller is from Hamilton, Ohio. Gloska is from Jacksonville, Florida. Ganiron is from. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Mandaline Hatch/Released)
U.S. Marine aircraft arrive in Kathmandu to support Nepal earthquake relief
U.S. Marines, Lance Cpl. Jacob A. Miller (top), Cpl. Garrett Gloska and Cpl. Eugene Ganiron, step off a Boeing C-17 Globemaster III onto Tribhuvan International Airport in Kathmandu, Nepal, May 3. Marines brought an UH-1N Huey, tools and equipment to support the government of Nepal. The Nepalese Government requested the U.S. Government’s help after a 7.8 magnitude earthquake struck their country, April 25. The Marines are with Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 469, Marine Air Group 36, I Marine Aircraft Wing, III Marine Expeditionary Force. Miller is from Hamilton, Ohio. Gloska is from Jacksonville, Florida. Ganiron is from. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Mandaline Hatch/Released)
Dennis E. Provencher, the district commander of Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 9723, Okinawa salutes the Ernie Pyle Monument April 19, after placing a floral wreath at the foot of the epitaph on Ieshima, Okinawa, Japan. Okinawa citizens, service members, veterans, Boy Scouts, and families gather to honor the 70th anniversary of Ernest T. “Ernie” Pyle’s death at the sight where he was killed in 1945 during the battle of Okinawa. Pyle was a Pulitzer Prize winner and served as a war correspondent from 1935 through most of World War II, famous for his columns for the Scripps-Howard newspaper chain. Pyle volunteered to deploy with the men of the Army’s 77th Infantry Division to report first-hand during the battle of Okinawa.
Ernie Pyle: famous war correspondent never forgotten
Dennis E. Provencher, the district commander of Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 9723, Okinawa salutes the Ernie Pyle Monument April 19, after placing a floral wreath at the foot of the epitaph on Ieshima, Okinawa, Japan. Okinawa citizens, service members, veterans, Boy Scouts, and families gather to honor the 70th anniversary of Ernest T. “Ernie” Pyle’s death at the sight where he was killed in 1945 during the battle of Okinawa. Pyle was a Pulitzer Prize winner and served as a war correspondent from 1935 through most of World War II, famous for his columns for the Scripps-Howard newspaper chain. Pyle volunteered to deploy with the men of the Army’s 77th Infantry Division to report first-hand during the battle of Okinawa.
Flowers lie at the foot of the Ernie Pyle Monument after being placed during a memorial ceremony April 19, on Iejima, Okinawa, Japan. Okinawa citizens, service members, veterans, Boy Scouts, and families gathered to honor the 70th anniversary of American war correspondent Ernest T. “Ernie”Pyle’s death at the sight where he was killed in 1945 during the battle of Okinawa. Pyle was a Pulitzer Prize winner and served as a war correspondent from 1935 through most of World War II, famous for his columns in the Scripps-Howard newspaper chain. Pyle volunteered to deploy with the men of the Army’s 77th Infantry Division to report first-hand during the battle of Okinawa.
Ernie Pyle: Famous war correspondent never forgotten
Flowers lie at the foot of the Ernie Pyle Monument after being placed during a memorial ceremony April 19, on Iejima, Okinawa, Japan. Okinawa citizens, service members, veterans, Boy Scouts, and families gathered to honor the 70th anniversary of American war correspondent Ernest T. “Ernie”Pyle’s death at the sight where he was killed in 1945 during the battle of Okinawa. Pyle was a Pulitzer Prize winner and served as a war correspondent from 1935 through most of World War II, famous for his columns in the Scripps-Howard newspaper chain. Pyle volunteered to deploy with the men of the Army’s 77th Infantry Division to report first-hand during the battle of Okinawa.
Col. Thomas A. Pecina, commanding officer of Headquarters & Support Battalion, Marine Corps Installations Pacific-Marine Corps Base Camp Butler, Japan, speaks on the accomplishments of American war correspondent Ernest T. “Ernie” Pyle’s accomplishments during a memorial ceremony April 19, at the Ernie Pyle Monument on Iejima, Okinawa. Okinawa citizens, service members, veterans, Boy Scouts, and families gathered to honor the 70th anniversary of Pyle’s death at the sight where he was killed in 1945 during the battle of Okinawa. Pyle was a Pulitzer Prize winner and served as a war correspondent from 1935 through most of World War II, famous for his columns in the Scripps-Howard newspaper chain. Pyle volunteered to deploy with the men of the Army’s 77th Infantry Division to report first-hand during the battle of Okinawa. “Ernie Pyle was a man who was down with the troops in the trenches and under enemy fire,” said Pecina. “He told the story of a fighting man the way a fighting man would want it to be told.”
Ernie Pyle: famous war correspondent never forgotten
Col. Thomas A. Pecina, commanding officer of Headquarters & Support Battalion, Marine Corps Installations Pacific-Marine Corps Base Camp Butler, Japan, speaks on the accomplishments of American war correspondent Ernest T. “Ernie” Pyle’s accomplishments during a memorial ceremony April 19, at the Ernie Pyle Monument on Iejima, Okinawa. Okinawa citizens, service members, veterans, Boy Scouts, and families gathered to honor the 70th anniversary of Pyle’s death at the sight where he was killed in 1945 during the battle of Okinawa. Pyle was a Pulitzer Prize winner and served as a war correspondent from 1935 through most of World War II, famous for his columns in the Scripps-Howard newspaper chain. Pyle volunteered to deploy with the men of the Army’s 77th Infantry Division to report first-hand during the battle of Okinawa. “Ernie Pyle was a man who was down with the troops in the trenches and under enemy fire,” said Pecina. “He told the story of a fighting man the way a fighting man would want it to be told.”
Hailey J. Day, financial official with G-6 communications Marine Corps Installations Pacific-Marine Corps Base Camp Butler, Japan, listens to instructions as she practices CPR during a class certifying Marines and Master Labor Contractors in adult, child and infant CPR, use of an automated external defibrillator and basic first aid in the Education Center April 22 on Camp Foster, Okinawa. CPR is a method used to maintain blood flow and brain function in an emergency situation such as a heart attack or drowning where the patient’s heart beat or breathing has stopped.
American Red Cross equips Marines, contractors with life-saving techniques
Hailey J. Day, financial official with G-6 communications Marine Corps Installations Pacific-Marine Corps Base Camp Butler, Japan, listens to instructions as she practices CPR during a class certifying Marines and Master Labor Contractors in adult, child and infant CPR, use of an automated external defibrillator and basic first aid in the Education Center April 22 on Camp Foster, Okinawa. CPR is a method used to maintain blood flow and brain function in an emergency situation such as a heart attack or drowning where the patient’s heart beat or breathing has stopped.
A Day to Remember frontman Jeremy McKinnon takes a GoPro camera from a fan and films the sea of hands reaching for him and eventually himself during the band’s performance at Foster Fest 2015 April 11 on Camp Foster Okinawa, Japan. Foster Fest is an annual festival held on the camp bringing service members and Okinawa residents together through food, games and live entertainment. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Matthew Callahan/Released)
A day to Remember rocks Okinawa
A Day to Remember frontman Jeremy McKinnon takes a GoPro camera from a fan and films the sea of hands reaching for him and eventually himself during the band’s performance at Foster Fest 2015 April 11 on Camp Foster Okinawa, Japan. Foster Fest is an annual festival held on the camp bringing service members and Okinawa residents together through food, games and live entertainment. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Matthew Callahan/Released)
Okinawa Marine News
Staff Non-commissioned Officers Need to Adapt to Ever-changing Corps for Promotion

By Cpl. Devon Tindle | July 28, 2015

Staff non-commissioned officers see the shrinking Corps as an obstacle they must navigate to continue their military careers. According to Pentagon personnel statistics, due to sequestration and other budget cuts, the Corps may have to reduce its numbers to 174,000 by the end of 2017. Meaning, the few will become even fewer. MORE
A more energy efficient Corps

By Lance Cpl. Daniel Jean-Paul | July 28, 2015

Whenentering Camp Foster through Gate 1, commuters are immediately greeted by alarge, white wind MORE
JSDF, Marines train for disasters

By Lance Cpl. Daniel Jean-Paul | July 24, 2015

Marines with MarineCorps Installations Pacific and Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadron 462, 1stMarine MORE
AAFES revamps daiko service, keeps service members safe

By Staff Sgt. Derek Carlson | July 23, 2015

Responsible drinking is a safety topic discussed by service members on a daily basis. These MORE
Iwakuni city assembly members visit MCAS Futenma

By Sgt. Antonio Rubio | July 20, 2015

A total of 24 Iwakuni City assembly members, Chugoku Shikoku Defense Bureau officials, Okinawa MORE
USO takes volunteers to Peace Memorial Park

By Lance Cpl. Jessica Collins | July 20, 2015

United Service Organizations, Okinawa treated its volunteers to a tour of Peace Memorial Park June MORE
NAVFAC improves efficiency of Camp Hansen sewage process plant

By Naval Facilities Engineering Command | July 15, 2015

Facilities Engineering and Acquisition Division Camp Butler completed repairsand upgrades to the MORE

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